Thursday, December 31, 2020

Parsley leaves

Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) is a herb belonging to the Apiaceae (formerly Umbelliferae) family. It is native to the Mediterranean region where it is found in the wild form.

The name petroselinum is derived from the Greek word petros which means “stone,” referring to the plant’s habit of growing in rocky places. It is a popular culinary herb, commercially cultivated as an annual plant in many parts of the world for its attractive and aromatic leaves. It is used as a garnish rather than a component of the diet. The oil derived from the leaves can also be used in condiments and seasonings.

Green parsley leaves have a mild, agreeable flavor, and are an excellent source of vitamin C, iodine, iron, and other minerals. Presence of essential oils (e.g., 1,3,8-p-menthatriene, phenylacetaldehyde, γ-elemene, α-terpineol, α-pinene, camphene), resinoid, oleoresin, linoleic and petroselinic acids, microelements (e.g., Ca, Fe), flavonoids (e.g., apigenin, luteolin, quercetin) but also vitamin C and carotene make it very valuable plant.

Fresh plant food can either be minimally processed or not further processed at all prior to consumption.

Although parsley leaves are used most commonly in the fresh green condition as a garnish, their characteristic flavor and green color can be retained if the leaves are dried rapidly.

Most useful method of storage is drying. The dried leaves are known as parsley flakes. The most frequently used process (except sun drying) is conventional air drying (at 40, 50, 80 °C), but nowadays, microwaves also are used for this purpose.

In modern medicine, wide range of pharmacological activity including antioxidant, hepatoprotective, brain protective, anti-diabetic, analgesic, spasmolytic, immunosuppressant, anti-platelet, gastroprotective, cytoprotective, laxative, estrogenic, diuretic, hypotensive, antibacterial and antifungal activities have been exhibited for this plant.
Parsley leaves


The most popular articles

Articles around the world

SAF-DYNAMICS of Food Science and Technology

FoodNavigator RSS